Welcome

(Contact Info: larry at larryblakeley.com)

Important Note: You will need to click this icon to download the free needed to view most of the images on this Web site - just a couple of clicks and you're "good to go." For reasons why - go here.

A listing and access link to all:
song lyrics and mp3 audio files http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/songs/ (all of which are a part of this Web site) can be accessed simply by selecting the "htm" file for the song you want;

poetry http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/poetry.htm;

quotations http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/quotations.htm; and

essays written by Larry Blakeley http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/articles_larry_blakeley.htm,

all of which are used to tell the story in this Web site, can be accessed by going to each respective link set out above.

My son, Larry Blakeley http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/larryblakeley_photos_jpeg.htm manages this Web site and the following Web sites:

Larry Blakeley (Contact Info: larry at larryblakeley.com)

Leslie (Blakeley) Adkins - my granddaughter

Lori Ann Blakeley (June 20, 1985 - May 4, 2005) - my granddaughter

Evan Blakeley- my grandson

Major Roy James Blakeley (December 10, 1928 - July 22, 1965) - USAF (KIA)

When I was young my dad would say
Come on son let's go out and play

No matter how hard I try
No matter how many tears I cry
No matter how many years go by
I still can't say goodbye

- "I Still Can't Say Goodbye," Performer: Chet Atkins

MP3 audio file/lyrics http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/songs/still_cant_say_goodbye.htm

For a larger image click on the photograph.

Added the following to Web page http://www.royblakeley.name/index.htm

.".. Thanks to the human heart by which we live,

Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears,

To me the meanest flower that blows can give

Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears."

- "Ode on Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood," William Wordsworth http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/poetry/odes_imitations_immortality_recollections_childhood.htm

Why am I doing this? One of many reasons - "because I can. This is my story."

"'Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?' 'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. 'I don't much care where--' said Alice. 'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat. '--so long as I get SOMEWHERE,' Alice added as an explanation. 'Oh, you're sure to do that,' said the Cat, 'if you only walk long enough.' (Chapter VI: Pig and Pepper)

... The White Rabbit put on his spectacles. 'Where shall I begin, please your Majesty?' he asked. 'Begin at the beginning,' the King said gravely, 'and go on till you come to the end: then stop.'" (Chapter XII)

ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/11 Lewis Carroll, The Millennium Fulcrum Edition 3.0

IN HONOR OF MY FATHER

"Dad - I will never forsake you ... I am you - Your Son, Larry"

There are certain parts in this story wherein I place myself back in time and try to convey to you the feelings of pain, sadness, and confusion from the perspective of an 11-year old boy that had just lost the person he most admired, loved, and needed at that crucial point in his life - the inevitable journey every boy must take - leaving the warm, secure, and loving arms of the mother - reaching up to take the hand of the father, filled with excitement, anticipation, and some insecurity as the father leads his son down the one-way road of manhood - never to return again. These things were dearly missed in my young life and led to much pain and sorrow for many years - a soul trying to find his way home through the turbulent 1960's and into the 1970's -soothed by experimental drug use (moderate) and binge drinking, until starting a family of my own. I "wanted" to change this pattern in order to provide a positive example for my children - so I "just did it" on my own initiative:

Come down off your throne

And leave your body alone

Somebody must change

You are the reason

I've been waiting so long

Somebody holds the key

But I'm near the end

And I just ain't got the time

And I'm wasted

And I can't find my way home

Come down on your own

And leave your body alone

- "Can't Find My Way Home," Steve Winwood, Blind Faith (Steve Winwood, Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, Rick Grech), 1969

But make no mistake about it when I think back of watching my children play and wanting to protect them from the real world as long as I could and ultimately forced to witness the horrifying experience of losing my youngest daughter - so excited to reach the next step in her young life. I see these things - and I cry and remember:

What though the radiance which was once so bright

Be now for ever taken from my sight,

Though nothing can bring back the hour

Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower;

We will grieve not, rather find

Strength in what remains behind;

In the primal sympathy

Which having been must ever be;

In the soothing thoughts that spring

Out of human suffering;

In the faith that looks through death,

In years that bring the philosophic mind.

- "Ode on Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood," William Wordsworth http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/poetry/odes_imitations_immortality_recollections_childhood.htm

As you have already noted by now poety,literature, and lyrics to music are used extensively as a vital part of my story.

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Our beloved daughter, Lori Ann Blakeley (June 20, 1985 - May 4, 2005)

You are invited to visit her Web site here http://www.loriblakeley.name/index.htm

Lori's Web site describes her last journey with cancer and a repository of memories of her short life here on earth. It will include items she would have wanted to share with her family, friends, and anyone that wants to know who she was and what was important to her life - such as her scrapbooking, photographs, and faith-based approach to life.

Her Web site is home for a repository of memories of her short life here on earth. It will include items she would have wanted to share with her family and friends - such as her scrapbooking, photographs, and faith-based approach to life.

Post Date: March 24, 2007 at 2:15 PM CDT; 1915 GMT

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Added the following to Web page http://www.royblakeley.name/royjamesblakeley/vietnam_history.htm

"There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.

... but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when she went back to the table for it, she found she could not possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of the table, but it was too slippery; and when she had tired herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and cried. (Chapter I: Down the Rabbit-Hole)

... 'That WAS a narrow escape!' said Alice, a good deal frightened at the sudden change, but very glad to find herself still in existence; 'and now for the garden!' and she ran with all speed back to the little door: but, alas! the little door was shut again, and the little golden key was lying on the glass table as before, 'and things are worse than ever,' thought the poor child, 'for I never was so small as this before, never! And I declare it's too bad, that it is!' (Chapter II: The Pool of Tears)

... Alice went timidly up to the door, and knocked. 'There's no sort of use in knocking,' said the Footman, 'and that for two reasons. First, because I'm on the same side of the door as you are; secondly, because they're making such a noise inside, no one could possibly hear you.' And certainly there was a most extraordinary noise going on within--a constant howling and sneezing, and every now and then a great crash, as if a dish or kettle had been broken to pieces. 'Please, then,' said Alice, 'how am I to get in?' 'There might be some sense in your knocking,' the Footman went on without attending to her, 'if we had the door between us. For instance, if you were INSIDE, you might knock, and I could let you out, you know. (Chapter VI: Pig and Pepper)"

ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/11, Lewis Carroll, The Millennium Fulcrum Edition 3.0

Post Date: March 24, 2007 at 11:00 AM CDT; 1600 GMT