Welcome

(Contact Info: larry at larryblakeley.com)

Important Note: You will need to click this icon to download the free needed to view most of the images on this Web site - just a couple of clicks and you're "good to go." For reasons why - go here.

A listing and access link to all:
song lyrics and mp3 audio files http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/songs/ (all of which are a part of this Web site) can be accessed simply by selecting the "htm" file for the song you want;

poetry http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/poetry.htm;

quotations http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/quotations.htm; and

essays written by Larry Blakeley http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/articles_larry_blakeley.htm,

all of which are used to tell the story in this Web site, can be accessed by going to each respective link set out above.

My son, Larry Blakeley http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/larryblakeley_photos_jpeg.htm manages this Web site and the following Web sites:

Larry Blakeley (Contact Info: larry at larryblakeley.com)

Leslie (Blakeley) Adkins - my granddaughter

Lori Ann Blakeley (June 20, 1985 - May 4, 2005) - my granddaughter

Evan Blakeley- my grandson

Major Roy James Blakeley (December 10, 1928 - July 22, 1965) - USAF (KIA)

When I was young my dad would say
Come on son let's go out and play

No matter how hard I try
No matter how many tears I cry
No matter how many years go by
I still can't say goodbye

- "I Still Can't Say Goodbye," Performer: Chet Atkins

MP3 audio file/lyrics http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/songs/still_cant_say_goodbye.htm

For a larger image click on the photograph.

[The original document in DjVu format here http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/monthly_articles/congressional_budget_office_intro200406.djvu]

The Congress's Establishment of CBO

Budgetary conflict between the legislative and executive branches reached a high point during the summer of 1974. Tensions centered on a fundamental disagreement between the President and the Congress over control of budgetary and spending priorities.

The Congress wanted major changes to counter the growing influence of the President that began with the Budget and Accounting Act of 1921. That law gave the President overall responsibility for budget planning by requiring him to submit an annual, comprehensive budget proposal to the Congress. It also created a new Bureau of the Budget (renamed the Office of Management and Budget in 1971) that expanded the President's control over budgetary information. The Congress, by contrast, lacked any institutional capacity to establish and enforce budgetary priorities, coordinate actions on spending and revenue legislation, or develop budgetary and economic information independently of the executive branch.

Members of Congress objected to then-President Richard Nixon's use of "impoundments" (withholding of appropriated funds) to thwart Congressional desires to fund programs that were inconsistent with his policies. Many Members also chafed under the executive branch's control of budgetary information and questioned the objectivity of economic assessments produced by presidential appointees. The dispute led to enactment of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, which was signed into law by President Nixon on July 12, 1974.

With the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (including the establishment of CBO), the legislative branch reasserted its constitutional control over the power of the purse. The law established new procedures for controlling presidential impoundments of funds. It also instituted a formal process, centered on a concurrent resolution on the budget, through which the Congress could develop, coordinate, and enforce its own budgetary priorities independently of the President.

The budget law created legislative institutions to implement the new Congressional budget process - the House and Senate Budget Committees to oversee execution of the budget process and the Congressional Budget Office to provide the budget committees and the Congress with an independent, nonpartisan source of budgetary and economic information.

Contents:

1 CBO’s Mission

- The Congress’s Establishment of CBO

- The Role and Responsibilities of CBO

2 CBO’s Staffing and Organization

- The Appointment of the Director

- CBO’s Staff

- The Organization of CBO

3 Obtaining CBO’s Publications and Contacting CBO

- How to Get CBO Publications

- How to Contact CBO

Appendix: CBO’s Managers

- "An Introduction to the Congressional Budget Office," The Congress of the United States, Congressional Budget Office (CBO) http://www.cbo.gov/Index.cfm, June 2004 http://www.cbo.gov/IntroCBO.pdf