Welcome

(Contact Info: larry at larryblakeley.com)

Important Note: You will need to click this icon to download the free needed to view most of the images on this Web site - just a couple of clicks and you're "good to go." For reasons why - go here.

A listing and access link to all:
song lyrics and mp3 audio files http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/songs/ (all of which are a part of this Web site) can be accessed simply by selecting the "htm" file for the song you want;

poetry http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/poetry.htm;

quotations http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/quotations.htm; and

essays written by Larry Blakeley http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/articles_larry_blakeley.htm,

all of which are used to tell the story in this Web site, can be accessed by going to each respective link set out above.

My son, Larry Blakeley http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/larryblakeley_photos_jpeg.htm manages this Web site.

Major Roy James Blakeley (December 10, 1928 - July 22, 1965) - USAF (KIA)

When I was young my dad would say
Come on son let's go out and play

No matter how hard I try
No matter how many tears I cry
No matter how many years go by
I still can't say goodbye

- "I Still Can't Say Goodbye," Performer: Chet Atkins

MP3 audio file/lyrics http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/songs/still_cant_say_goodbye.htm

For a larger image click on the photograph.


Larry,
It appears that we will set up future Business Review articles so that both an html version and a pdf version are available online.
So, my congratulations and thanks, you have pushed us in a direction which we probably should have gone in earlier.  
In any case, I hope this is useful.
Yours,

Leonard

Economic Advisor and Economist
Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
10 Independence Mall
Philadelphia PA 19106-1575

215-574-3804  


Larry Blakeley <larry@larryblakeley.com>

09/13/2004 10:19 AM

       
        To:        Leonard.Nakamura@phil.frb.org
        cc:        
        Subject:        Re: [Fwd:  "CEOs, Clerks, Computers, and the Rise of Competition in the Late 20th Century"]


Thanks, Leonard (Larry's fine with me).  My problem with PDF is that it originated as a way of distributing documents to others so that it could be printed out.

My belief is that there are much more opportunities to teach concepts, ideas, etc. by utilizing hypermedia/hypertext and that the internet and world wide web is being underutilized for advancing teaching methods.

Your article, in my opinion, can be looked upon as a point of view by your peers and as a bucket of information for others to increase their knowledge and understanding of ideas of yours (see my pyramid of knowledge - you are on the bottom, I'm somewhere else, and then there are millions above me) .

What if people could follow your ideas (by following hyperlinks) at their knowledge level? (i.e. recommender system/knowledge warrior principles)  Do you believe you could reach more audiences?  I think so.

In any event, PDF (which is a proprietary product, by the way - it is not open for others, only "tiff" did they make available for others 10-15 years from now to be able to recreate programs to process the coding instructions) seems to be taking over without any thought whatsover (even by some of the most intelligent among us) of preservation/storage issues, etc.

Here's what I had to do to get your article to a point where you could use hyperlinking for the pursuit of deeper understanding  (on "any word," phrase, reference, etc."):

1. go to Adobe's PDF to Text conversion tool at http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/access_onlinetools.html
2. select "Web-based forms submission tool in English"
3. Enter the URL where your article is stored http://www.phil.frb.org/files/br/brq304ln.pdf
4. Then copy over to a text editor, edit out all of this funky stuff, copy to WordPerfect for cleaning up the "hard returns" and doing some other find and replace cleanup chores.
5. Then review the article, character by character, word by word in order to make sure it is exactly what you wrote and the same grammatical markings used.
6.  Then move it back to the text editor and a new HTML file for access by others.

Many people are not concerned with, or understand whether the "potential" of the internet and the www for teaching are being pursued by those with valuable knowledge and information to share with humanity.  I am not wired to think that way.  I see the potential - and, sadly, too many are "locking up" knowledge and information inadvertently, or rather unpremeditated, mostly because that's the format everyone else is using - when, in fact HTML can be accessed by all computers throughout the world.

However, in order to convert your PDF article for other countries that do not speak English - PDF is no good.  Now, if it's HTML, then it can be converted for third-world countries to learn from the USA.

Best Regards,

Larry



Leonard.Nakamura@phil.frb.org
wrote:

Dear Mr. Blakeley,
Sorry to be slow in responding.  I was away on vacation for a couple of weeks and have been very busy.  In general we are very happy to accommodate reprint requests, so I don't see why I couldn't just send you a copy of my work in any convenient format.  However, I'm not a completely free agent here -- the copyright is held by the Fed, the Web site is operated by the Fed, blah blah -- so I will have to send the request to the Business Review editor.  How would you most prefer the formatting?

Leonard

Economic Advisor and Economist
Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
10 Independence Mall
Philadelphia PA 19106-1575

215-574-3804  

Larry Blakeley <larry@larryblakeley.com>

09/10/2004 05:02 PM

       
        To:        Leonard Nakamura <leonard.nakamura@phil.frb.org>
        cc:        
        Subject:        [Fwd: "CEOs, Clerks, Computers, and the Rise of Competition in the Late 20th Century"]



I suppose no answer means "no," or possibly just "no interest" in
responding. - Larry Blakeley


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----- Message from Larry Blakeley
<larry@larryblakeley.com> on Sat, 04 Sep 2004 15:12:28 -0500 -----
To: Leonard Nakamura <leonard.nakamura@phil.frb.org>
Subject: "CEOs, Clerks, Computers, and t he Rise of Competition in the Late 20th Century"


Hi, Leonard - just a note to tell you that I learned from your article.

Question: Do you guys ever post in something other than PDF.  I
converted your article to text then sorted through it to correct the
mistakes after conversion.  It took about 4 hours.  This procedure, at
times helps me understand more deeply, but sometimes I would like to
place the information for reading by others.

In any event, I will be looking for other articles by you in the future.

Best Regards,

Larry Blakeley, a "Knowledge Warrior"
http://www.larryblakeley.com/experts/jonathon_levy/knowledge_warriors.htm


Dallas, Texas

http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/recent_articles_of_interest_abstracts.htm_


_

_Recent Articles of Interest Abstract_s



."... the rise of computers in the 1970s made life riskier for the large
industrial corporation. The result has been more entry by smaller firms,
more new product competition, and compelling vitality for the U. S.
economy. The cost has been that life at the top within the large
corporation has become tougher: riskier, faster, busier. Corporate
hierarchies have flattened, and CEOs spend more time with their division
heads and perhaps less time contemplating the long view.

Corporate executives are being treated as if their decisions mattered
much more to corporate profitability and are being held accountable
accordingly. The talent and effort required to successfully run a
corporation may well have risen substantially. In such circumstances, it
would be surprising if corporate salaries were not rising to compensate
for the heightened demands and shortened careers.

All this implies greater conflict in the relationships among
shareholders, boards of directors, and top corporate officers. Recent
episodes of corporate wrongdoing may be a symptom of uneven progress
toward new institutional structures."

- "CEOs, Clerks, Computers, and the Rise of Competition in the Late 20th
Century," Leonard Nakamura, Economist, Research Department, Philadelphia
Federal Reserve http://www.phil.frb.org , Business Review FRB
Philadelphia Third Quarter 2004. Pages 33 - 41. (5,718 words)

[HTML
<http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/monthly_articles/leonard_nakamura2004Q3.htm>
]
http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/monthly_articles/leonard_nakamura2004Q3.htm

[Text
<http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/monthly_articles/leonard_nakamura2004Q3.txt>
]
http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/monthly_articles/leonard_nakamura2004Q3.txt


Post Date: September 3, 2004 at 8:10 PM CDT; September 4, 2004 0110 GM




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